Get to Know the New DOL Wage and Hour Administrator Image Banner

Get to Know the New DOL Wage and Hour Administrator

You are here

Get to Know the New DOL Wage and Hour Administrator

Monday, February 11, 2019
Categories: 

ANCOR is sharing this post by Wage and Hour Blog because much of the Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division’s work is relevant to providers in their function as employers. It is important for providers to know the comings and goings of Administration figures since nominations can affect the direction of policy-making in an agency, as well as its workflow.

As written by Wage and Hour Blog:

“On February 1, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor publicly designated Keith Sonderling as Acting Administrator of the Wage and Hour Division (‘WHD’).  He joined WHD in September 2017 as a Senior Policy Advisor, receiving a promotion to Deputy Administrator last month.  Before joining the Department, he was a shareholder in the Gunster law firm in West Palm Beach, Florida, where he represented businesses in labor and employment matters.

During his time with WHD, Sonderling has been a strong proponent of the agency’s Payroll Audit Independent Determination program (known as ‘PAID’), which under certain circumstances allows employers to self-report violations to WHD and to make the workers whole in exchange for a release.  He has also led numerous public listening sessions for stakeholders to express their views about the forthcoming revisions to the regulations implementing the executive, administrative, and professional exemptions to the minimum wage and overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (the ‘FLSA’).

Sonderling steps into the role vacated last month by Bryan Jarrett, who led WHD since October 2017.  President Trump nominated Cheryl Stanton to serve as Administrator of WHD in September 2017, and she continues to wait for a confirmation vote in the Senate.

WHD enforces the minimum wage, overtime, and child labor provisions of the FLSA, as well as the Family & Medical Leave Act and several prevailing wage statutes applicable to federal government contracts, among other laws.”